Weaving and spinning thoughts

This evening an email set me to thinking about why I spend so much more time spinning then weaving.

Opportunities to weave were squeezed into any free moment possible, even a five minutes of waiting for tea to brew was time to throw the shuttle. I even enjoy the slow work of hemstitching the ends while the web is still on the loom.
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Whenever spinning flirted with me I quickly turned my back on such a thought. When presented in a tantalizing way I’d remember my mom’s hilariously dismal attempts to learn how to spin from a Navajo friend. No way! Not when I could buy wonderful yarns perfect for weaving from a local source just up the road from where we lived in Portland.

Ed practically hauled me over to a vendor who was selling a beginner’s spinning kit AND was willing to get me started. He decided there was no way I should pass up the opportunity to broaden my fiber world.

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My loom has seen far too little action these past few years. As I go about the daily tasks, dreams of weaving flit through my mind. Right now two projects are waiting in the wings including a simple one that shouldn’t take more than a few days.
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The other project will take hours of planning and preparation before the warp is on and the actual weaving can begin.

Therein lays the main reason that spinning has taken over.

It’s easy. Grab some fiber, a spinning tool and you’re spinning.

With a spindle it’s also portable. How I love that aspect! Sure, weaving with a small loom is sort of portable.

Snort. Not in the easy way of spindle spinning.

While waiting for a concert:DSC00220
Sitting on the porch at McMenamins Edgefield passing time before a concert, people watching. When I returned from a stroll this woman was asking Ed about the spindle which was peeking out of the small tea canister sitting on the arm of the Adirondack chair next to Ed. A knitter who wanted to learn how to spin.
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Getting fresh air and exercise:
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I have no idea how many miles spindles have accompanied me during walks. Well over a pound of BLF has been spun as have other smaller projects.

Spinning is a soothing tactile way of relaxing. It can also be mindless; a productive hands-on activity which allows me to listen to audios, watch a movie, think, or pray.

Weaving remains a passion. My goal these next few weeks is to manage my time better in order to carve out a regular weaving routine. In my dream world I’d spend a certain amount of time each day spinning, weaving, playing the violin, practicing the piano and walking. Someday.

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Author: Wanda J

I never dreamed my life would be entangled with fiber and the tools used to produce fibery items. When I bought a boat shuttle Ed looked at it, decided to make a better one and the rest is history. For a decade he made shuttles, crochet hooks, knitting needles, until his spindles became so popular that he had to devote his time to making them, as well as Great Wheels. Free time is spent reading, trying to coax food from the ground, and playing in the creek near our place. I love long walks and camping far from crowds. Playing my fiddle beside a stream or with good friends brings sweetness to my soul. Sundays we try to set aside for worshiping God with our small Quaker meeting.

4 thoughts on “Weaving and spinning thoughts”

  1. The project on your loom is beautiful! And your dream world definitely sounds like it is possible. Even if you started out with just one hour each day per activity…you would still have time left over to do other things like eat and sleep…Yup…very doable!!! Weave and spin on my friend!
    (And keep posting too, I am enjoying reading your thought each day!)

    1. Doable — except the majority of my hours are spent business working. 🙂 That’s where I’m trying to streamline. Stuff like photo shots and picture editing take more time than I like. I’m slow and methodical plus my time management skills are pathetic.

      On Sat, Nov 21, 2015 at 6:21 AM, Fiberjoy wrote:

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  2. It’s so interesting to learn that you came to weaving first, and that you resisted learning to spin; I had no idea! Kudos to Ed for getting you to give it a try! Look where this has led both of you… now creating new spinners and wonderful tools for them (to their greatest delight!).

    I sincerely hope that you’ll find ways to bring your daily life closer to your dream life, so that it includes as much time as your heart desires for all the creating and music and walking… You’ll get there!

    1. It has been a fascinating journey!

      Thanks for your encouragement. Self-discipline about time management will be the key.

      On Sat, Dec 5, 2015 at 6:41 PM, Fiberjoy wrote:

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