A comment in the previous post asked “I just don’t understand how the sizes work and how much yarn to get.
I want to knit a sweater for a 2-year-old. What pattern do I follow? If you can help, that would great.”

I admit that it took some mental gymnastics for me to figure out how in the world the pattern worked for all those various sizes. I’m not sure I could have tackled knitting the Child’s Surprise Jacket for my 5-year-old grandson without having first knit the baby version for my 6 month old granddaughter.
Violet's BSJ
In knitting the BSJ I followed the written out instructions on page 2 of the pattern. It took an entire skein of 100g of sock yarn, 405 yards and I almost ran out. For a toddler I’d want twice that amount, which should be more than enough. If you’re planning to have stripes then 400 yards of the main color and three or four skeins of other colors should do the trick, depending on how big the stripes are. (Using variegated yarn for the first BSJ was a blessing since it eliminated the need to weave in all the ends and making sure the color sequence looked balanced and good.)

My advice for someone making their very first BSJ, but for a toddler, would be to use a worsted yarn and the size of needle that would get you 5 stitches per inch so that you can follow the row by row instructions on page 2.

But, if you’re up for a challenge and you want to make one using a specific yarn then read on:

Before starting a CSJ for my five-year old grandson I carefully read the Option instructions on pg 4 as well as all the CSJ instructions on pg 8. Next I swatched to determine what my [K] was using the sportweight yarn I’d bought. The last time we’d been together I’d measured Wesley’s chest, arm length and from the back of his neck to just below his waist. With 24″ (chest circumference) for my starting figure I knit three swatches to determine stitches per inch using US 4 needles,  US5 and US6. The look and feel of the swatch from the US5 needles. (40″L circs) at 6 stitches per inch gave the best result.

Circumference: 24″ divided by 2 for the width = 12″
12 x 6 (spi) = 72  divided by 3 = 24  (It’s a happy coincident that 24″ circumference ends up back at 24 as K.)
24 was the K for this sweater.

(I use a notebook to keep records on my knitting projects. Good notes and swatching are crucial  for a successful outcome with Elizabeth Zimmerman’s SJ, along with a calculator if you don’t like doing math on paper.)

To make a sweater for a two-year old I’d go with the chest size of 21″ since that’s a typical chest size of a 2 yo.

21 divided by 2 = 10.5 x whatever stitches per inch you get when swatching with your yarn and needles (For this example I’ll use 6.5 spi using #3 needles but I’d definitely swatch first for exact gauge/stitch count.)
10.5 x 6.5 = 68.25 divided by 3 = 22.75 = K
Cast On 9[K](22.75) = 205 stitches (rounded up)

Follow the directions as written on page 8. It really helps to write out the sequence of the process, not only to help you wrap your mind around it but to clearly see at a glance in your notebook where you’re at with increases and decreases. The sweater looks like an alien amoeba until the latter half when you’re able to bring the sleeves into position.

In other news. Spring is in the air here in Oregon! I reveled in warm sunshine while mowing the yard today. Having clear sunny skies is balm to the soul. Last Friday we went to a farm that has plants for sale and bought a kumquat tree, along with some other plants. In the afternoon we planted peas and spinach seeds in the garden. We’re looking forward to spending more time outside working in the garden and the small greenhouse that we put up over the past few weeks.
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